The Master Crafter – LolDeanTimber

WHO STARTED IT

Dean and Liam Stanborough, a father and son, family led business.

LoldeanTimber started as an idea from the love of wood and being able to create useful, innovative and bespoke products for all our customers.

every one of our handmade products we use; From our poultry perches, to our garden trugs to our trough planters.

We have supplied personalised garden trugs all over the Uk and have sent a few to the USA.

It fills us with enormous pride seeing our trugs being shown off with so many gorgeous homegrown harvests.

I (liam) was never very interested in veg, until Dad (dean) started growing tomatoes and peas in the garden and I tasted a pea straight from the pod and I was won over from then.

I would always watch river cottage and dreamt of the life that Hugh Fernley Whittingstall was living.

We grew more and started to consider becoming self-sufficient.

First stop was chickens and we have been making chicken coops for customers for years.

So, we decided to build out ‘Cluckingham Palace’ and soon enough our girls were laying their eggs.

We’ve always had a keen interest in cooking so it goes hand in hand with our allotment growing, cooking dishes, preserving jams and sauces, even making our own elderflower wine and apple cider from all our homegrown produce.

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We have expanded our growing area over the last couple of years by relocating up to Norfolk.

Which allowed us to expand loldeantimber and push on with our business and create more exciting products.

Also, allowing us to expand the amount of chickens we have. And adding ducks to our smallholding
we have even hatched a few of our own chickens fertilised eggs.

We purchased a polytunnel to match our ambitions of growing more veg and creating more exciting dishes and sauces so we can feed not only us but give them as gifts to our friends and family to get their feedback on the food we make.
We love taking our nephews and niece for a walk down the garden and picking some of our plot produce that they helped us plant.
so they can see what they planted is what they grew and be able to eat what they grew and learn about each veg and how tasty it is.
They have always been brought up around the chickens, playing with them indoors when they were just chicks to playing outside in the garden feeding them and collecting their eggs.

We built our own compost bins last year and fill them through the year with food scraps, and chicken and duck manure which acts as a great fertiliser so will be using all our well-rotted down compost on our raised beds this coming year.

Very much looking forward to growing as a business and as a self-sufficient family for many more years to come.

Guest Author: Liam Stanborough is a master craftsman specialising in creating some of the best trugs in the business for that perfect personalised touch. You can find his excellent work on Facebook or Twitter

 

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The Awesome Richard Chivers – Get ready to Sharpen your spades

Welcome to Sharpen Your Spades.

It’s strange to think but until 2007 I had no interest allotment gardening. I had no interest in gardening at all.

Today, I can’t imagine not having an allotment and not feeling as passionate about it as I do.

My grandfather was a market gardener, and even in retirement he turned all of their garden over to rows of vegetables. Despite spending every other Sunday at their home, playing next to the beds of vegetables with my brother and cousins and eating a home cooked Sunday lunch that boasted all the veg from the garden, it didn’t rub off on me. Not then.

Growing my own started with a packet of tomato seeds, a pot and a tiny back yard and emerged from my passion to cook. As I cooked more, I learned a key lesson – It’s not the complexity of a recipe that makes for an excellent dish but the ingredients that are used to make it.

One year, I decided to grow my own. In early spring I sowed a few tomato seeds and with little knowledge or experience I waited to see what would happen. What followed became an obsession.

In 2007, Carol Klein presented a 6 part series on the BBC – Grow your own veg. The series arrived at the right time. My passion to grow my own had developed further and when this programme all about growing your own vegetables arrived on the TV, I was hooked.

I placed my name on the local allotment list and bought the book accompanying the series.

I’ve had an allotment, in various guises, for nine years but for many reasons it never lasted. In April 2015 I took on my current plot and I’ve never felt so settled.

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Like most families, we have busy working lives and it’s easy to understand that the thought of taking on an allotment can be daunting. However, I genuinely believe it’s possible to manage the daily life and keep up with an allotment garden too.

I started sharpenyourspades.com around the same time as I began work on the allotment. It originated as a way to document my progress and clarify my thoughts on growing my own.

It’s come a long way since then – as well as an allotment diary, I write articles on all matters of allotment gardening and growing your own. I’ve become as passionate about the blog as I am about the allotment.

Writing is a key part of my learning. I’m not a horticulturist and have no formal training. I’m just passionate about growing my own fruit and veg. I hope in some way it means I’m able to provide a different perspective on allotment gardening.

I use organic principles. It has it’s frustrations but it’s also fun experimenting. It’s satisfying to get results without resorting to chemical management and control of the food we eat.

My six-year-old daughter, Ava, spends a lot of time with me on the allotment. She loves it. It’s wonderful seeing her excited about the crops we grow together. I want her to have a relationship with food, understand where it comes from and be thrilled eating it. I hope I can inspire others to join us in the great adventure of allotment gardening.

Guest Author: Richard Chivers is an allotment blogger and “grow your own” enthusiast. He manages sharpenyourspades.com , where he writes about all manner of allotment gardening topics, as well as providing updates on his own family allotment, which he works on with his young daughter. You can also follow him on Facebook and Twitter.

Friends are always beneficial

Interplanting, the idea of pairing two items or more together that each help each other. Wouldn’t it be fantastic if they world worked like this.

I’m happy to report that in the vegetable world this is very attainable and if done right can be the most effective pest control. No chemicals or input just pure growing.

So what are the benefits?

A lot really. If you strive for complete organic growing the main objective is to NEVER use any form of fungicide or pesticide. There is ALWAYS an organic alternative. And hey, it can look beautiful too.

Despite vegetables weaknesses and vulnerability to attack from pests, each has their own special scent or ability that can directly help a plant in a different family. Call them superpowers if you will.

So how does this work?

Easy. By planting set vegetables around each other, you are creating a confusion of scent that each predator uses to identify their victim. The result, they cannot find them therefore evading an attack. There are also a huge amount of combinations, which is good news at it means there is always usually a combination that can help you. But as always there are also plants which don’t get along, so there are a few rules to follow.

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Perfect, what do I do?

Below is a general chart of the most common plants, their good neighbours and their neighbours from hell.

As a general rule this will give you the best results, so why not give them a go?

Vegetable Awesome Neighbours Neighbours from hell
Beans Brassicas, Carrot, Cucumber, Peas, Potatoes Alliums (chives, garlic, leeks, onions), Peppers, Tomatoes For Broad Beans: Fennel
Beetroot Brassicas (Broccoli,Sprouts,Ccabbage),   Garlic, Lettuce, Onion Runner Beans
Broccoli Basil, Bush Beans, Chamomile, Cucumber, Dill, Garlic, Lettuce, Marigold, Mint, Onion, Potato, Radish, Rosemary, Sage, Thyme, Tomato Grapes, Mustard, Oregano, Strawberry, Tomato
Brussels Sprouts Potato, Strawberry
Cabbage Beets, Dwarf French Beans, Mint, Onion Climbing Beans
Carrots French Beans, Garlic, Lettuce, Onion, Peas, Rosemary, Tomatoes Parsnip
Cauliflower Beets, Dwarf French Beans, Mint, Onion Strawberries
Corn Beans, Cucumbers, Parsnip, Peas, Potatoes, Pumpkin, Squash, Tomato
Cucumber Beans, Corn, Lettuce, Peas, Radish Potatoes, Strong smelling herbs, Tomatoes
Leeks Carrots, Celery, Lettuce, Onions Beans, Peas
Lettuce Beans, Beets, Carrots, Corn, Marigold, Onions, Peas, Radish, Strawberries Parsley
Onions Beets, Cabbabe, Carrots, Lettuce, Marjoram, Rosemary, Savory, Strawberry, Tomato Beans, Peas
Parsley Asparagus, Beans, Radish, Rosemary, Tomato Lettuce
Peas Beans, Cabbage, Carrots, Celery, Corn, Cucumber, Lettuce, Marjoram, Parsnip, Potato, Sage Alliums (Chives, Garlic, Onion, Shallots)
Potatoes Beans, Cabbage, Corn, Eggplant, Horseradish, Marjoram, Parsnip Celery, Cucumber, Pumpkin, Rosemary, Strawberries, Tomato
Pumpkins Beans, Corn, Radish Potato
Spinach Beans, Lettuce, Peas, Strawberries  
Strawberries Borage, Bush Beans, Caraway Broccoli, Cabbages
Tomatoes Alliums, Asparagus, Basil, Borage, Broccoli, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Marigold, Peppers Brassicas, Beets, Corn, Dill, Fennel, Peas, Potatoes, Rosemary

So I hope this gives you a rough guide to the concept of Interplanting.

Let me know how you get on the comments below or send some inspiration to @homegrownwxm

Steve

 

The Starting Point – Top 10 Beginner Veg

Want to grow you own but don’t know where to start? Or just simply baffled by the varieties out there?

Then stress not.

Below you will find my top 10 things for any new comer to try.

I have grown and still grow these. Every year they consistently give me a superb yield whilst also being quite forgiving. They are also perfect for beginners as they practically look after themselves only needing a little input.

This is just a rough guide based on my experiences and methods vary from person to person. There is no rule. If you find a way that suites you go with it. The only elements that stay the same is watering, protection & enjoying the experience.

French Beans (Ferrari)

Skill: Easy

One of the best varieties I use and perfect for small spaces. Can even be grown in pots. Produce perfect string-less beans which can be eaten raw.

Method: Sow in Modules indoors around end of March. Plant outdoors when first set of true leaves are visible. Average time sow to pant out is 4 weeks. Soil should stay intact when lifting plant out of module and roots visible.

Top Tip: When plants start to flower at around 8 weeks after sowing, give plants a comfrey liquid feed at a ratio of 1 parts comfrey to 9 parts water.

 

Calabrese F1 (Brocolli)

Skill: Easy

The most reliable variety I have grown and one of the easiest. Calabrese is often mistaken for broccoli, yes it is the same as the supermarket style but I couldn’t be more different. The difference is not the taste but the appearance. Traditional broccoli grows in spears. This grows a large head which is easier harvested and quick to grow.

Method: Sow in Modules indoors around end of March. Plant outdoors when first set of true leaves are visible. Average time sow to pant out is 4 weeks. Soil should stay intact when lifting plant out of module and roots visible. Ensure you firm them in when planting as they like a good footing.

Top Tip: When plants start to produce the main head at around 10 weeks after sowing, give plants a comfrey liquid feed at a ratio of 1 parts comfrey to 9 parts water.

 

Sprouts (Crispus)

Skill: Easy

Another reliable variety. Sprouts are very easy to grow if you follow a few steps. Pigeons love them along with slugs so giving them the right protection is key. Ensure they are netted up at all times to ensure the best harvest. Spouts traditionally stay in the ground for a long period of time and usually up to 6 months. They are at their sweetest after a frost.

Method: Sow in Modules indoors around end of April. Plant outdoors when first set of true leaves are visible. Average time sow to pant out is 4 weeks. Soil should stay intact when lifting plant out of module and roots visible. Ensure you firm them in when planting as they like a good footing.

Top Tip: If you find you get a crop around autumn before frost, simply harvest and freeze for 48 hours before use. This will sweeten them up ensuring you can have a harvest at any point of the year! Sprouts are not just for Christmas 😉

 

Peas (Kelvedon Wonder)

Skill: Easy

Peas are very easy to grow. They can vary in size from only 2ft right up to over 7ft depending on variety. There are two types of seed. Autumn and Spring planted. You can usually tell by the pea seeds. If they are wrinkly then they are spring, Smooth is for autumn. The only pointer here is support. Bamboo canes are perfect. If you can afford it chicken wire.

Method: Sow direct outdoors around end of March for spring and October for overwintering varieties or autumn. Cover with chicken wire to protect from mice & birds until shoots are around 3 inches.

Top Tip: Pick the pods as you go. The more you pick the more it will produce.

 

Carrots (Nantes)

Skill: Easy

Scatter and leave! Done. Honestly that’s it although small; they take a while to germinate but eventually they grow. They germinate best when soil temps stay around 20c. The main problem is crusting. This is when the soil forms a hard layer on the surface of the soil. The easiest way to deal with this is applying a small layer of compost over the seeds and keep damp.

Method: Sow direct outdoors between March and July. Sow every few weeks to have a good supply.

Top Tip: Mix a small amount with sand so they get sown at a more even rate. Benefit is you also get to see where you planted them!

 

Onions (Red Barron)

Skill: Easy

I always use onion sets. These can be picked up very cheap and resemble a small bulb. Just ensure that the bulbs are firm. If you can squash them, chuck them.

Method: Grow in modules. Simply push fat end down half way into the soil and water. Keep warm and in a week you will start to see them growing. Plant out when the roots are well formed. The soil should lift out in full when you inspect them.

Top Tip: Keep the soil weeded and evenly watered. A good starting point is to give a generous amount once per week. This will allow the roots to go deeper ensuring they are more resilient to drought.

 

Parsnip (Goliath)

Skill: Easy

Exactly the same process as carrots. Scatter and leave! Done. Honestly that’s it although small; they take a while to germinate but eventually they grow. They germinate best when soil temps stay around 20c. The main problem is crusting. This is when the soil forms a hard layer on the surface of the soil. The easiest way to deal with this is applying a small layer of compost over the seeds and keep damp.

Method: Sow direct outdoors between March and July. Sow every few weeks to have a good supply.

Top Tip: Mix a small amount with sand so they get sown at a more even rate. Benefit is you also get to see where you planted them!

 

Beetroot (Boltardy)

Skill: Easy

Beetroot is one of the best root vegetables you can have. There is nothing more satisfying than seeing beetroot grow. Always reliable, perfect for the beginner.

Method: Sow direct outdoors between March and July. Sow every few weeks to have a good supply.

Top Tip: Keep the soil weeded and evenly watered. A good starting point is to give a generous amount once per week. This will allow the roots to go deeper ensuring they are more resilient to drought.

 

Climbing French Beans (Cobra)

Skill: Easy

French beans are very easy to grow. They can easily grow to over 7ft. Supports are essential here. Bamboo canes are perfect. Just ensure you give them enough space as they like to tangle up and jump canes!

Method: Sow in Modules indoors around end of April. Plant outdoors when first set of true leaves are visible. Average time sow to pant out is 4 weeks. Soil should stay intact when lifting plant out of module and roots visible.

Top Tip: Pick the pods as you go. The more you pick the more it will produce.

 

Sweetcorn (Minipop)

Skill: Easy

Part of the grass family; Sweetcorn is very reliable. Their biggest enemy is slugs. They easily grow to 7ft and produce various cobs. There are two varieties, open pollinated and self-fertile. For beginners I say to use self-fertile as you get the growing experience with the increased chance of a crop. ‘Minibel’ will produce mini corn that can be used for stir fry and salads.

Method: Sow in Modules indoors around end of April. Plant outdoors when around 6-8 inches high and all risk of frost has passed. Average time sow to pant out is 4 weeks. Soil should stay intact when lifting plant out of module and roots visible.

Top Tip: Pick when tufts (Stringy part) are brown to black in colour. Enjoy.

 

So there you have it.

 

Of course there are thousands of varieties each of which you may find better for you. But that’s the point.

 

One thing I encourage is experimenting.

 

You have the power to choose what you want to eat and get the satisfaction of watching it grow and mature.

 

The saying really is true. If you grow your own food, it tastes different. It tastes better and this is a guarantee.

 

Just remember you cannot fail.

 

Steve